Prevalence of Periodontal Diseases among Urban and Sub-urban 15 years old school children in Khartoum State, Sudan.

Faisal Awad Idris

Abstract


Periodontal diseases are of the most common oral disorders that afflicting millions of people all over the world. There are changes in the distribution of these diseases coupled with major conceptual advance related to its progression. Aims of this study were to: (a) Study the prevalence of periodontal diseases among urban and sub-urban 15 year old school children in Khartoum State, Sudan. (b) Provide data that assist health administrators in future planning of oral health services in Sudan. Methods: A cross sectional study both descriptive and analytical was conducted among 428, 15 year old Sudanese school children who were randomly selected, living in urban and sub-urban areas. Data was collected using a closed-ended questionnaire along with an oral clinical examination form. According to WHO recommendation, Community Periodontal Index (CPI) was used. The three indicators, gingival bleeding, calculus and periodontal pockets were assessed. The data was analyzed using the appropriate statistical tests. P-Value was set at 0.05 for significance level. Results: Percentage of children from sub-urban areas with bleeding, calculus and shallow pockets were more than the percentage of children living in urban areas with the same conditions, while the percentage of children with healthy periodontal condition is more in urban areas compared to sub-urban areas. Children from urban areas attend dental clinics more regularly than those from sub-urban areas (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference in attendance by gender (P = 0.09). When periodontal condition of the children was computed with tool used (brush, Miswak or both), no significant difference was observed (P = 0.26). The majority of the children (80%) brush their teeth at morning only. Dental caries status of the children (mean DMFT± S.D) was not related to different periodontal indicators. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the existence of living area gradients in periodontal diseases prevalence, and attendance pattern to dental clinics, where children from urban areas were more regular attendees than those from sub-urban areas.


Keywords


Periodontal Disease, Prevalence, Young Adults, Sudan

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